Super Bowl III

 

1969 Bay Area Beginnings

  • Donald and Doris Fisher open the first Gap store on Ocean Avenue in San Francisco, selling jeans, records and tapes aimed at the “generation gap” – young adults and teenagers 

1969 Bay Area Seen and Heard

  • San Francisco band Sly and the Family Stone logged two top ten songs in the Billboard 100 – Everyday People and Hot Fun in the Summertime
  • One of the top grossing movies of the year, Paint Your Wagons, featured Lee Marvin and Clint Eastwood as California gold rush prospectors

 

Fantasy football, the game played by more than 33 million people across the country each year, has its roots in Oakland. A group of friends including Oakland businessman Wilfred Winkenbach, Raiders Public Relations professional Bill Tunnel and Oakland Tribune reporter Scotty Stirlin created the Greater Oakland Professional Pigskin Prognosticators League (GOPPPL) and had their inaugural draft in 1963. The group continued to play amongst friends until league co-founder Andy Mousalimas brought the game to his sports bar, the now-defunct King’s X in Oakland. The game slowly grew in popularity, spreading to other Oakland bars and into San Francisco, and then slowly across the United States until 1997 when CBS launched the first fantasy draft available for free via a website.

On November 20, 1969, the Indians of All Tribes – a group of mostly students led by Richard Oakes from San Francisco State College – began their peaceful occupation of Alcatraz Island. Laying symbolic claim to the Island, the occupation continued for 19 months as the group sought to erect several Indian institutions including a center for American Indian Studies, a museum and a spiritual center on the island, as well as address the policy the U.S. had instigated 16 years earlier of closing reservations and relocating its inhabits to urban areas.

Native people still recognize the occupation for what it was and remains: a seminal event in American history that brought the plight of American Indians to the world’s attention – said actor Benjamin Bratt and his brother Peter to CNN on the 40th anniversary of the occupation. The Bratt brothers lived on the island with their mother during part of the occupation.

The occupation gained attention across the country, resulting federal laws that demonstrated new respect for aboriginal land rights and for the freedom of American Indians to maintain their traditional cultures. The history of Alcatraz occupation is included as part of the tours of Alcatraz by the National Parks Service.